Heritage

History

The citizens of the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians (Tribe) are the people of northern Los Angeles County. After thousands of years, foreign powers began colonization in the late 1770s with the arrival of the Spanish followed by the establishment of Mexico and the United States. Despite settler colonization, the Tribe continues to operate as a tribal community.

The Tribe originates in the lineages, villages, and cultures of the period that came before the establishment of Mission San Fernando in 1797, from which their ancestors received the name Fernandeño during enslavement by the Spanish. The Native Americans that were taken to the Mission originally inhabited the villages originating in the Simi, San Fernando, Santa Clarita, and Antelope Valleys. After the Mission period, they became known as the Fernandeño historical Indian tribe. The Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians is comprised of the descendants of that historical tribe of Fernandeños.

Historical

Timeline

The Historical Timeline is an interactive timeline designed to provide important dates of the the Fernandeño Tataviam Band of Mission Indians community and history from time immemorial to present. Please note that this is not, and is not intended to be, an all-encompassing history of the Tribe.

Time Immemorial

Creation stories tie the Tribe to the land since time immemorial...
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450 C.E.

Creation stories tie our ancestors to the land since time immemorial...
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1797: Spanish Settlement

Historical Tribe of Fernandeños emerged from the Mission San Fernando...
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1813: Survival & Resistance

Fernandeños continue to practice their culture and ceremonies...
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1834: Mexican Secularization

Mexicans secularize the missions...
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1843: Land in Trust

Fernandeños petition for and receive over 18,000 acres of land...
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1846: Last Alcalde at Mission SFR

The last alcalde was elected...
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1847: California Genocide

Government-sanctioned Indian genocide in California...
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1848: American Settlement

California became an U.S. holding...
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1850: U.S. Census

By 1850, only 117 Fernandeños are counted...
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1851: Indian Extermination & Land Loss

Indian extermination and loss of Fernandeño land holdings...
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1876: Porter & Maclay v. Cota et al.

On July 1, 1876, a group of 7 Indians took over some land on the old mission and ejected Porter and ...
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1885: U.S. Attorney Represents Fernandeños

In 1885, U.S. Special Attorney for Mission Indians...
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1892: Federal Recognition of Tribe

Federal Agent assists the Fernandeños...
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1906: Fernandeño schoolchildren

Many Fernandeño Tataviam children...
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1912: Not Extinct

Ancestor Juan Jose Fustero is incorrectly labeled "the Last Tataviam Indian" by settlers.
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1917: Captain Antonio Maria Ortega

Ethnologist J.P. Harrington's notes on June 9, 1933 state:
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1928: Census Roll

Applying under the Census Roll of the Indians of California...
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1932: Federal Verification

Bureau of Indian Affairs Sacramento Indian Agency seeks verification of Fernandeño community members...
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1940s: U.S. Army

Many Fernandeño Tataviam families enlisted in the U.S. Army.
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1960s: Cultural Presentations

With the rise of American Indian activism, the Tribe became more publicly...
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1966 Tribal Funeral Book

In a funeral book for a Tribal Captain Eulogio Ortega...
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1968: BIA visits FTBMI

The San Fernando Mission Indians of San Fernando, led by Captain Ortega Sr., met with Bureau of Indian Affairs ...
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1971: Communication with Federal Government

Captain Ortega Sr. issues letters to Robert Finch, President Nixon’s Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare...
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1985: Tribe advocates for Encino Burials

Tribal members mobilized around the long overdue reburial of their ancestors at Encino...
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1995: Tribe Hosts First Pow-wow

This newspaper article reports how the Tribe hosts a Pow-wow...
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1999: Annual Gathering

In this newsletter, the FTB recapitulates the history of the Annual Gathering...
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2004: Non-Profit (re)Established

The Tribe formally incorporates Pukúu Cultural Community Services...
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2009: Rudy Ortega Sr. Park

Tribe begins negotiating with City of San Fernando...
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2009: Federal Petition #158

The Tribe submitted a full petition for federal acknowledgement to the OFA.
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2011: Tribe Awarded Education Grant

California Tribe Envisions a Bright Future for American Indian Youth The U.S. Department of Educa...
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2015: Captain Ortega Jr.

Rudy Ortega Jr. is elected as President, or Captain, of the Tribe...
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2018: 17 Protocols of Archdiocese

On March 28, 2018, Tribal President Rudy J. Ortega Jr. (far right in above photo), on behalf the Tribe, signed the Statement of Native American Protocol for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles. 
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2020: Covid-19 Response

In March 2020, the Tribe refocused its administrative projects...
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2021: LA County Apology

In the motion by County of Los Angeles Board of Supervisors...
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2021: L.A. Mayor Joins FTBMI

Community wellness gathering co-hosted by the Tribe and LADWP...
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2022: Tribal Conservation Corps Launches

On Friday, June 10, at the new CNRA Headquarters building, California Department of Conservation Dir...
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Fernandeño Territory