On Sunday, July 17, 2016, the Tataviam family gathered at Rudy Ortega Sr. Park to participate in an exciting workshop on how stone artifacts, known as lithics, are/were made in Tataviam Country!

If you’ve ever wondered what “flakes” are, or how one makes a projectile point, then this workshop is the one for you! Not only will you receive an overview of stone tools, but our participating experts provide actual materials to interact with and utilize!

Elisabeth Rareshide (UCSB) introducing the presentation. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

Elisabeth Rareshide (UCSB) introducing the presentation. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

The archaeological experts that presented information on lithic analysis included Joanne Minerbi, Graduate Student at Cal State Northridge, and Elisabeth Rarshide, Graduate Student at University of California Santa Barbara. Their in-depth presentation focused on finding lithics in the field, identifying lithics and debitage, and overall lithic production.

Joanne Minerbi (CSUN) during the presentation. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

Joanne Minerbi (CSUN) during the presentation. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“People in different cultures have different ways of solving the same problem, such as how to hunt for food… lithics can reveal patterns of trade and exchange. For example, some raw materials are only available from limited sources. A community that lives near a raw material source may obtain toolstone directly from the source. They may then trade some of their stone to another community that lives farther from the source.” –An introduction to Stone Tools by Joanne Minerbi and Elisabeth Rareshide, 2016.

The Tataviam family also had the opportunity to watch Dr. Matthew R. Des Lauriers, Associate Professor at Cal State Northridge, make obsidian artifacts in front of them!

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Professor Matthew R. Des Lauriers utilizing a piece of antler to strike the stone. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

His flintknapping demonstration was followed by participation by members of the Tataviam family, who got to take home an obsidian artifact!

Jesus Alvarez, Tataviam, trying flintknapping. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

Jesus Alvarez, Tataviam, trying flintknapping. Photo by Timmy Ornelas.

 

“Social identity is linked to technological traditions… the culturally-accepted ways of performing particular tasks varies between groups, and people may use their technological traditions to show their membership in their community and to distinguish themselves from other groups” –An introduction to Stone Tools by Joanne Minerbi and Elisabeth Rareshide, 2016.

Tataviam plans on repeating this workshop in the Fall. Please stay tuned for more information!